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Senate Republicans are scraping together votes to debate the health-care bill

Updated July 25 at 2:11 p.m.

 

 

One GOP senator has indicated she opposes the latest version of the bill.
13 others have expressed concerns with some form of the bill.
If three vote against it, the bill would fail.

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Collins

Maine

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Capito

W.Va.

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Cassidy

La.

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Corker

Tenn.

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Heller

Nev.

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Hoeven

N.D.

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Johnson

Wis.

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Lee

Utah

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McCain

Ariz.

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Moran

Kan.

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Murkowski

Alaska

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Paul

Ky.

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Portman

Ohio

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Sasse

Neb.

Senate Republicans are hurtling toward a health-care vote this week, but it’s unclear whether they have the votes to partially “repeal and replace” Obamacare, as they’ve promised to do for the past seven years. Not only that — it’s unclear what will be included in the final version of the bill, and whether they will have the 50 votes to formally open debate on the issue. The vote to debate on a vote is planned for Tuesday.

Assuming no Democrats vote for this bill (a safe assumption because it attempts to unravel Obamacare) and with Sen. McCain (R-Ariz)’s return to Washington, Senate leaders can afford to lose only two Republican votes to open debate. So far, one senator (Susan Collins of Maie) has said she'll vote "no," while other key senators (Rob Portman of Ohio, Dean Heller of Nevada and Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia) have said they'll vote to start debate. Many more have opposed the most recent version of the legislation. Here's a breakdown of what went wrong.

Among 52 GOP senators ...

50 votes are needed to pass

(Vice president would break a tie)

So only two

can defect

Who might vote no?

We’re tracking every Senator’s position on the bill. Below we take a look at some groups of Republicans who might have a reason to vote no, highlighting those who’ve said that they’re opposed and those who’ve said that they have concerns.

 

 

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